Simple & Spectacular Glazed Ham

christmas glazed ham ham holiday recipe sauces
food stylist
Helena Picone
photographer
Hallie Burton
prop stylist
Brooke Deonarine
recipe developer
Diana Andrews

You Need

  • 7- to 10-lb bone-in, spiral-cut city ham
  • glaze of choice, from the recipes below

Wickedly Delish Glazes for Ham

Each glaze recipe yields enough to generously glaze up to a 10-pound, bone-in, spiral-sliced city ham. Remove your ham from its package, discard the glaze, and instead use one the glazes below. Follow the reheating instructions included with ham packaging and the glazing instructions indicated in the recipes below.  

Make-Ahead Tip

Glazes can be made up to 3 days in advance and refrigerated in an air-tight container until ready to use. Reheat gently on a low setting in short bursts in the microwave or in a small saucepan over low heat. For both rewarming methods, stir frequently until the mixture is warmed through and brushable. 

Apricot-Peach-Ginger Glaze Ingredients

Makes about 2 cups 

Ingredients 

  • 1 1/2 cups apricot preserves, about 1 lb 
  • ½ cup peach preserves, about 5 oz 
  • 6 Tbsp water 
  • 2 Tbsp Calvados 
  • 2 tsp freshly grated ginger 
  • Pinch kosher salt

Hot Honey-Dijon Glaze Ingredients

Makes about 2 cups  

Ingredients 

  • 1 cup Dijon mustard, about 8 oz 
  • 1 cup honey, about 12 oz 
  • 2 Tbsp Madeira, optional 
  • ¼ tsp ancho chili powder, more to taste 
  • Pinch kosher salt

Pineapple-Orange-Chipotle-Glaze Ingredients

Makes about 2 cups 

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup canned crushed pineapple (in pineapple juice), about 10-3/4 oz

  • 1 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, about 9 oz 

  • 1 Tbsp light brown sugar 

  • 2 tsp minced canned chipotle in adobo pepper 

  • 1 tsp chipotle in adobo sauce from the can 

  • Pinch kosher salt 

TIP:

  • To freeze ham, portion leftovers into batches, double wrapping, dating, and labeling each package before stashing it away. 
A true master of all things culinary, Diana Andrews is professional chef, cooking instructor, recipe developer, test kitchen director, food editor, and so much more. From styling to photography to on-camera work, if it’s food-related, Diana does it.

When shopping for a holiday ham, beware that not all hams are created equal. There are basically three types of ham (four if you count Uncle Harry): city ham, country ham, and fresh ham. I prefer city ham. And I’ll explain why. Read on to learn all about ham.  

What exactly is ham? A whole ham is fabricated from the pig’s entire butt and leg, weighing between 15 and 20 lb. A whole ham will feed a considerable crowd, with lots of meat remaining for many, many meals to come. Therefore, buying a smaller section from either the fattier butt or the leaner shank (i.e., leg) may be more convenient and economical.

City ham is easy to find in practically all markets during the holiday season. By the time a city ham lands in the store, it has been soaked in a wet brine of salted water and flavor enhancers and then fully cooked by smoking or boiling. This is one of the great  advantages of city hams. When you start with fully cooked ham, you don’t have to toil as hard. Preparing the ham you bring home is largely a matter of reheating it according to the directions on its package, making it an ideal and uncomplicated choice for the novice cook or those of us who want to keep things simple. City hams are equally appealing to experienced cooks because we know we’ll spend much less time in the kitchen and more time enjoying our guests.  

Country ham is packed in salt to dry-cure, usually smoked, and then aged three months or longer. Dry salt curing makes country ham very flavorful while also helping to control bacterial growth. The longer a country ham ages, the funkier, saltier, and more concentrated its flavor becomes. A dense country ham is usually served sliced paper thin, or it is rinsed and soaked for 12 to 24 hours and then cooked.  

A fresh ham is simply a raw, uncured, uncooked, unprocessed piece of pork taken from the pig’s hind leg.  

Hams sold in various ways: bone-in, boneless, or spiral sliced. A 7- to 10-lb bone-in ham will generally feed about 12 to 16 people. Once again, you’ll probably have leftovers, but don’t worry! Ham freezes incredibly well. 

So, let’s bake ham!

Apricot-Peach-Ginger Glaze for Ham 

Hints of warming of ginger and Calvados combine with the juicy sweetness of apricot-peach preserves to make this enticing glaze. 

Instructions

Step 1 
Add all the ingredients to a medium saucepan. Heat over medium high until the mixture begins to boil, whisking frequently. Lower the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes, continuing to whisk frequently.  

Step 2
Transfer the mixture to a blender and blend until smooth, 45 seconds to 1 minute. Let the mixture cool before using.  

Glazing Options: 

Option 1: Wait for the mixture to cool and use the entire quantity to glaze the ham twice. Brush the mixture over the ham 20 minutes before fully reheated, and once again 10 minutes before removing from oven. 

Option 2: Divide the mixture in half. Use 1 cup to glaze the ham, brushing the mixture over the entire ham 10 minutes before removing from oven. Rewarm the remaining cup of glaze, transfer to a serving bowl and pass with the ham at the table as a dipping sauce.  

Hot Honey-Dijon Glaze for Ham 

Traditional Dijon and honey flavors get a subtle kick from fruity ancho chili powder. Madeira, although optional, adds a deeper dimension to the glaze.  


Instructions 

Step 1
Add all the ingredients to a medium saucepan. Heat over medium high until the mixture comes to a low boil, whisking frequently. Lower the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes, continuing to whisk frequently.  

Step 2
Remove from the heat and let cool before using.  

Glazing Options: 

Option 1: Wait for the mixture to cool and use the entire quantity to glaze the ham twice. Brush the mixture over the ham 20 minutes before fully reheated, and once again 10 minutes before removing from oven. 

Option 2: Divide the mixture in half. Use 1 cup to glaze the ham, brushing the mixture over the entire ham 10 minutes before removing from oven. Rewarm the remaining cup of glaze, transfer to a serving bowl and pass with the ham at the table as a dipping sauce.

 


Pineapple-Orange-Chipotle Glaze for Ham 

This tangy, sweet, and spicy glaze hits all the right notes. Spunky and bright, yet harmonious and rich.


Instructions 

Add all the ingredients to a medium saucepan. Heat over medium high until the mixture begins to boil, whisking frequently. Lower the heat to low and simmer for 2 minutes, continuing to whisk frequently.  

Transfer the mixture to a blender and blend until smooth, 45 seconds to 1 minute. Let the mixture cool before using.  


Glazing Options: 

Option 1: Wait for the mixture to cool and use the entire quantity to glaze the ham twice. Brush the mixture over the ham 20 minutes before fully reheated, and once again 10 minutes before removing from oven.

Option 2: Divide the mixture in half. Use 1 cup to glaze the ham, brushing the mixture over the entire ham 10 minutes before removing from oven. Rewarm the remaining cup of glaze, transfer to a serving bowl and pass with the ham at the table as a dipping sauce.

 

Join the Discussion

/ online Casino

Amazing! Its in fact amazing article, I have got much clear idea concerning from this piece of writing. https://penzu.com/p/b31b2681

Join the Discussion

What do you think of the post?
You have to be logged in to post a comment